THE BEAUTIFUL NASIR OL MOLK MOSQUE IN SHIRAZ

THE ANCIENT JAMEH ATIGH MOSQUE IN SHIRAZ

The Ancient Jameh Atigh Mosque in Shiraz is th oldest and an ancient mosque dating from 894 and represents Shiraz’s oldest Islamic Structure though most of what you see is from the late Safavid period onwards.

When you walking through the southeastern back of the entrance to the Shah Cheragh Courtyard and turning right after about 50 meter leads to the Ancient Jameh Atigh Mosque.

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Review of the ancient Jameh Atigh mosque of Shiraz

When inside the courtyard’s of the Jameh Atigh mosque the dome of the north iwan and the hypostyle columns in the ancient prayer hall in the southeast corner are most impressive among the rest, the highlight of the Jameh Atigh Mosque is the rare turreted Khoday-Kahe (The Hosue of the God), It was build in the mid 14th century or perhaps even earlier to preserve valuable Qurans, poet Hafez is believed to have worked here.

The Khoday-Khane bears an uncanny likeness to the Kaabe at Mecca, and bears a unique Sassanid-style Tholth inscriptions in raised stone characters on a tiled background.

VAKIL BAZAAR IN SHIRAZ

Shiraz’s ancient trading district is comprised of several bazaars dating from different periods. The finest and most famous is the Bazar-e Vakil , a cruciform structure commissioned by Karim Khan as part of his plan to make Shiraz into a great trading centre. The wide vaulted brick avenues are masterpieces of Zand architecture, with the design ensuring the interior remains cool in summer and warm in winter. Today, it’s home to almost 200 stores selling carpets, handicrafts, spices and clothes and is one of the most atmospheric bazaars in Iran, especially in the early evening when it is fantastically photogenic. As usual, it’s best explored by wandering without concern for time or direction, soaking up the atmosphere in the maze of lanes leading off the main thoroughfares.

Source: Lonely Planet

PARS MUSEUM AND NAZAR GARDEN IN SHIRAZ

This formal garden and a delightfully decorated octagonal pavilion at its centre (now the Pars Museum) are other notable Zand-era additions. Karim Khan once received foreign dignitaries in the pavilion, which has a stunning interior; its muqarnas ceiling is a particular highlight. Exhibits include Karim Khan Zand’s sword. Photography is not allowed.

Source: Lonely Planet

VAKIL MOSQUE OF SHIRAZ

Begun in Karim Khan’s time, this mosque next to the Bazar-e Vakil has an impressive tiled portal, a recessed entrance decorated with tiles and muqarnas , two vast iwans , a magnificent inner courtyard surrounded by beautifully tiled alcoves and porches, and a pleasingly proportioned 75m-by-36m vaulted prayer hall supported by 48 carved columns. Inside the prayer hall are an impressive mihrab and 14-step marble minbar, carved from a monolith carried all the way from Azerbaijan. Much of the tiling, with its predominantly floral motifs and arabesques, was added in the early Qajar era. You’ll find it near the exit from the Shamshirgarha Bazaar.

Source: Lonely Planet

KARIM KHAN CITADEL

Dominating the city centre, this burly fortress was built in the early Zand period and formed part of the royal court that Karim Khan had hoped would develop to rival Esfahan. The high walls feature ornamental brickwork and are punctuated by four attractive 14m-high circular towers. The southeastern tower has a noticeable lean, having subsided onto the underground cistern that served as the Arg’s bathhouse.
Inside the Arg is a large, open courtyard filled with citrus trees and a pool. A dusty museum of the Zand period, with wax figures in traditional dress, occupies rooms off the northwest iwan.
Source: Lonely Planet

Shiraz

SHIRAZ

Shiraz is one of the populous city in Iran and it is located in the southwest of Iran.

Shiraz is known as the city of lovers,also is one of the most modern cities.there are many sightseeing attractions in this city that attracted a lot of tourists every year.

attractions such as:Eram Garden,Tomb of Hafez,Arg of Karim Khan,Qur’an Gate,Persepolis,Pasargadae and Shāh Chérāgh

The Tomb of Hafez and its associated memorial hall, the Hāfezieh, are two memorial structures erected in the northern edge of Shiraz, Iran, in memory of the celebrated Persian poet Hafez. The open pavilion structures are situated in the Musalla Gardens on the north bank of a seasonal river and house the marble tomb of Hafez. The present buildings, built in 1935 and designed by the French architect and archaeologist André Godard, are at the site of previous structures, the most well-known of which was built in 1773. The tomb, its gardens, and the surrounding memorials to other great figures are a focus of tourism in Shiraz.

The Arg of Karim Khan is a citadel located in the north-east of Shiraz, southern Iran. It was built as part of a complex during the Zand dynasty and is named after Karim Khan, and served as his living quarters. In shape it resembles a medieval fortress.

At times, the citadel was used as a prison. Today, it is a museum operated by Iran’s Cultural Heritage Organization

The Nasīr al-Mulk Mosque is a traditional mosque in Shiraz, Iran, located in Goade-e-Araban place (near the famous Shah Cheragh mosque). The mosque was built during the Qājār era, and is still in use under protection by Nasir al Mulk’s Endowment Foundation. It was built by the order of Mirza Hasan Ali Nasir al Molk, one of the lords of the Qajar Dynasty, in 1876 and was finished in 1888. The designers were Muhammad Hasan-e-Memar and Muhammad Reza Kashi Paz-e-Shirazi.

The mosque extensively uses colored glass in its facade, and displays other traditional elements such as panj kāseh-

Shiraz’s ancient trading district is comprised of several bazaars dating from different periods. The finest and most famous is the Bazar-e Vakil,a cruciform structure commissioned by Karim Khan as part of his plan to make Shiraz into a great trading centre. The wide vaulted brick avenues are masterpieces of Zand architecture,with the design ensuring the interior remains cool in summer and warm in winter. Today,it’s home to almost 200 stores selling carpets,handicrafts,spices and clothes and is one of the most atmospheric bazaars in Iran,especially in the early evening when it is fantastically photogenic. As usual,it’s best explored by wandering without concern for time or direction,soaking up the atmosphere in the maze of lanes leading off the main thoroughfares.

The beautiful Masjed-e Vakil was begun by Karim Khan and is the only major mosque surviving from the late Zand period. Beside the entrance to the bazaar,it has two vast iwans to the north and south,a magnificent inner courtyard surrounded by beautifully tiled alcoves and porches,and a pleasingly proportioned 75m-by-36m vaulted prayer hall supported by 48 carved columns. Inside the prayer hall are an impressive mihrab and 14-step marble minbar, carved from a monolith carried all the way from Azerbaijan. Much of the tiling,with its predominantly floral motifs and arabesques,was added in the early Qajar era.

Bagh-e Naranjestan is Shiraz’s smallest garden and is famous as the setting for the opulently decorated Naranjestan-e Ghavam pavilion,built between 1879 and 1886,as part of a complex owned by one of Shiraz’s wealthiest Qajar-era families. The pavilion’s mirrored entrance hall opens onto rooms covered in a breathtaking combination of intricate tiles,inlaid wooden panels and stained-glass windows. Ceilings in the upstairs rooms are particularly interesting,with the beams painted with European-style motifs,including Alpine churches and busty German frauleins.

The Aramgah-e Sa’di and its generous surrounding gardens are appropriate for a man who wrote so extensively about gardens and roses. It’s a tranquil place,with the tombstone housed in an open-sided stone colonnade,inscribed with various verses from Sa’di and supporting a tiled dome

Naqsh-e Rustam is an ancient necropolis located about 12 km northwest of Persepolis, in Fars Province, Iran, with a group of ancient Iranian rock reliefs cut into the cliff, from both the Achaemenid and Sassanid periods. It lies a few hundred meters from Naqsh-e Rajab, with a further group of Sassanid reliefs. Naqsh-e Rostam site contains funerary related works belonging to the Elamite (second millennium BCE), Achaemenid (550–330 BCE) and Sassanid (226–651 CE) eras. Naqsh-e Rostam is a site believed by archaeologists to have been a cemetery for Persepolis, where Achaemenid, Parthian and Sassanid royalty were laid to rest.